The Family Courts Are Killing Our Children

The “Family” courts are killing our children. Let’s unite to shut them down:

 
According to the CDC in 2016, youth suicide statistics:
 
Youth suicides attempts approximately 156000/year or about 18/hour or one attempt about every 3.3 minutes.
 
From these youth suicide attempts about 4600/year actually die in the attempt. That is about 13 youth a day, or about one youth every 2 hours.
 
The main cause for these suicides is the desintegration of the family, which is mainly caused by the corruption in “family” courts in America. Don’t believe it, check out Divorce Corp. documentary in NetFlix.  In other words, “family” courts are mainly responsible for the attempts and suicides of these youths every year.
The “family” courts have become one of the most destructive forces to children in our society.  They have created a fatherless generation: fatherless homes account for 63% of youth suicides (US Dept. Of Health/Census) , 90% of all homeless and runaway children, 85% of all children exhibiting behavioral disorders (Center for Disease Control), 80% of rapists motivated with displaced anger (Criminal Justice & Behavior, Vol 14, p. 403-26, 1978), 71% of all high school dropouts (National Principals Association Report on the State of High Schools), 75% of all adolescent patients in chemical abuse centers (Rainbows for all God`s Children), 70% of juveniles in state-operated institutions (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988), and 85% of prison youths (Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992). See Congressional testimony HERE.
 
So, as you can see, it’s not racism what’s causing the increase in crimes, poverty, lack of education, or other social problems in our societies, but the breakdown of the natural family driven in great part by federal Title IV-D and IV-E incentives. From an excellent book I just read: I think you might like this book – “The Federalist Pages: A Constitutional Path to Restoring America’s Greatness” by Florida Representative Julio Gonzalez, M.D., J. D.
An easy read, providing history to what made America great, how it declined, and how to make it great again! Start reading it for free: http://a.co/ackDEOK
 
“The inevitable conclusion is that racial and ethnic disparities abound. But these facts alone do not answer the question of whether this is due to racism. To answer this question, we should begin by exploring those markers indicative of America’s racial attitudes. A 2013 Gallup poll indicated that the approval rate of marriages between blacks and whites had increased from a 4% favorable rating in 1959 to 87% in 2013. If one stratifies out whites who were polled, the approval rate still remains at 84%. Even more promising, those approval rates are much higher among younger adults relative to older ones (96% among 18-29 year-olds compared to 70% among those that are 65 year-old or older). Moreover, the multiracial population (people who identify themselves as being of mixed races or multiple races) is growing at three times the rate of the general population with 60% of these mixed race people being proud of their background. Also, the incidence of integrated metropolitan neighborhoods is increasing. One study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development found a 50% increase in integrated neighborhoods between 1990 and 2010 (up from 20% of neighborhoods overall to 30%), and the integration of these neighborhoods has been more permanent. So, with the favorable attitudes towards minorities and other races in America, is it possible that other explanations may exist for the persistence of racial disparities? The answer is yes.
 
One possible explanation is the correlation between intact marriages and life accomplishments among ethnicities. Consider that in America more than 67% of women who gave birth in 2011 identifying themselves as black were unmarried. For Hispanics, that number was 43%, and for Asians and whites, the numbers were 11.3% and 23% respectively. What’s more, blacks who were married remarry at a lower rate than non-blacks. These correlations between single parents and economic outcomes remain consistent for each ethnic group—even when factoring in racism. Asians have fewer children out of wedlock than whites and outperform whites despite a history of prejudice against them.
 
The statistical consequences of these trends have been stark, particularly on the data regarding broken homes and children in poverty. Thirty-seven percent of single-parent families live in poverty compared to 8.8% of married couples while 49% of children in single-mother households grow up in poverty compared to 11.6% in households headed by married couples. Predictably, the distribution of childhood poverty mirrors the incidence of broken families among racial groups with 32% of Asians living in poverty compared to 32.3% of whites, 42.9% of blacks, and 51.4% of Hispanics.
 
This is the same pattern encountered when measuring the prevalence of intact families throughout the various racial and ethnic groups. Similarly, the national imprisonment rates show associations between criminal and drug related activities and broken homes and families. In 2013, those incarcerated for drug-related offenses made up the largest subgroup of prisoners. In the meantime, the lowest incidence of drug abuse among adolescents exists in families headed by the biological mother and the biological father [the natural family].
 
Additionally, adolescents living in a single-parent home are significantly more prone to engage in delinquent behavior than those living in a family headed by the biological mother and the biological father. Of greater significance, children of disrupted families are at greater risk of engaging in drug use and illicit activities despite the racial make up of the family. And finally, data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth show a higher incidence of incarceration in adolescents proceeding from fatherless families. So, perhaps the incidence of economic disparities is less a result of persistent racism than the effects of the relative frequencies in family breakdown. If this is the case, then government’s efforts today should be geared at creating an environment supportive of families rather than providing an environment supporting entitlement or outcomes equality.
 
And what promotes marital unity and cohesiveness? Faith. Many argue that religion does not play a role in maintaining intact families. In support of their argument they point out the similarities in divorce rates between religious denominations, even citing studies finding a lower divorce rate among individuals describing themselves as atheists. They are missing the point. The stabilizing influence in a marriage, a family, and even a person’s life, generally, is not the denomination from which the person proceeds, but from the active presence of God and faith within the life of the individual and his or her family.
 
This association is much more difficult to scientifically tease out because of the absence of a single source of data on such measures. Added to this is the difficulty in measuring faithfulness. But there are some indications that support an association between the intactness of the family and faith. The Survey of U.S. Catholics performed by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University found that the majority of Catholics who are divorced were not married in the Church. And although the divorce rates amongst Catholics were similar to the national average, those who attended church regularly had a substantially lower divorce rate of 28% compared to 47% for those who did not. From these statistics, it is reasonable to conclude that discrimination and racial prejudice is playing a progressively smaller role in racial disparities.”
We must stand up and unite to defend our youth. “Family” courts all over this nation must be shut down. I vow to fight for the American youths, and the countless of parents dying because of this corruption. To learn more visit www.VoteMario.Us, and www.VoteFamily.Us.
 
Mario Jimenez, M.D.
Florida Senate Candidate for District 40
CAPRA National Board Director

Taking Our Families Back